ナイジェリア の通信、モバイル、ブロードバンド及びデジタルメディア市場

◆英語タイトル:Nigeria - Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Digital Media - Statistics and Analyses
◆商品コード:BUDD609048
◆発行会社(調査会社):BuddeComm
◆発行日:2016年8月24日
◆ページ数: 105
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【レポートの概要】

This report provides a comprehensive overview of trends and developments in Nigeria’s telecommunications market. The report analyses the mobile, internet, broadband, digital TV and converging media sectors. Subjects include:
Market and industry analyses, trends and developments;
Facts, figures and statistics;
Industry and regulatory issues;
Infrastructure developments;
Major players, revenue, subscribers, ARPU, MoU;
Internet, VoIP, videostreaming;
Mobile voice and data markets;
Broadband (FttP, DSL, cable, wireless);
Convergence and Digital Media;
Mobile subscriber forecasts;
Mobile market forecasts for selective years to 2021.
Government policies affecting the telecoms industry;
Market liberalisation and industry issues;
Telecoms operators – privatisation, IPOs, acquisitions, new licences;Mobile technologies (GSM; 3G, HSPA, LTE).Researcher:- Henry LancasterCurrent publication date:- August 2016 (15th Edition)


Nigerian regulator hoping telecoms accounts for up to 25% of GDP by 2025Nigeria has one of the largest telecom markets in Africa, supported by the second largest economy on the continent after South Africa. Given the potential for further growth, the sector attracts considerable foreign investment. Far reaching liberalisation in recent years has led to hundreds of companies, many of them small and localised, providing varied telecom and value-added services in an effectively regulated market.
The mobile sector has benefited from market competition and the wider deployment of LTE services during the last two years, which has supported operator revenue and encouraged the adoption of mobile broadband among subscribers. Other than the key mobile network operators, there are a number of additional players operating under a unified licensing regime.
After a decade of failed privatisation attempts, the incumbent national telco Nitel and its mobile arm M-Tel went into liquidation, with the NATCOM Consortium acquiring the telco in March 2015 for some $252 million.
Nigeria has the most competitive fixed-line market in Africa, featuring a second national operator (Globacom) and over 80 other companies licensed to provide fixed-telephony services. The alternative carriers combined now provide around 85% of all fixed connections while the ailing incumbent.
Several microwave and fibre-based national backbone networks are being rolled out by various companies. Nitel’s monopoly on international fibre bandwidth via the SAT-3/WASC submarine cable system ended in 2009 when Globacom’s Glo-1 cable landed in the country. Additional submarine cables which have landed subsequently, supported by improved domestic fibre infrastructure, have delivered a further boost to the country’s developing broadband sector by improving bandwidth and reducing prices for end-users.
The broadband sector has seen considerable consolidation among players, from over 400 ISPs in 2012 to around 90 by mid-2016. Most internet connections are via mobile networks, principally GSM and 3G and more recently LTE, though there are a number of WiMAX operators which have found niche markets.
Supported by the expansion of national fibre backbone networks, platforms such as e-commerce, online banking and e-payments, e-health, e-learning and e-government are evolving rapidly. The government has continued with its plan to increase broadband penetration to 36% by 2018 and to enable over 80% of the population to be able to receive mobile broadband via 3G and LTE technologies.
Nigeria has Africa’s largest mobile market, with about 150 million subscribers and a penetration rate of 107%. The rapid growth in the number of subscribers led to problems with network congestion and quality of service, prompting the telecom regulator to impose fines and sanctions on the network operators. These operators have responded by investing billions of dollars in base stations and fibre optic transmission infrastructure to support the ever increasing demand for bandwidth.
Efforts are also being made to encourage network sharing and to outsource the management of tower infrastructure to third parties. There remains considerable growth potential in rural areas where the provision of network infrastructure and operations is expensive, and consequently where mobile penetration is lower. Competition of voice pricing has encouraged operators to develop new revenue streams from mobile broadband and data services, including m-payments and m-banking.
Although the market is one of the most competitive in Africa, the industry regulator between 2013 and early 2016 applied a price floor on voice and data tariffs in a bid to prevent the dominant operators from squeezing competitors. Following years of delay, Mobile Number Portability (MNP) was finally introduced in 2013, and this has stimulated market competitiveness. The terrorist group Boko Haram has created difficulties for network provision and maintenance in the northern states, a difficulty which neither the government nor operators are properly positioned to address.
Key developments:

MTN Nigeria awarded spectrum in the 2.6GHz band for LTE use, extends licenses for spectrum in the 900MHz and 1800MHz bands to August 2021;
NCC and NITDA establish joint committee to collaborate on efforts to develop the telecoms and ICT sectors;
Government proposes new 9% tax tax on telecom services;
Regulator hopes for the telecoms sector to account for up to 25% of GDP by 2025;
Government shelves plans to sell NigComSat;
Regulator starts licensing process to award spectrum in the 38GHz and 48GHz bands and to re-plan use of the 23GHz band for broadband services;
Government devising strategy to increase broadband penetration to 36% by 2018;
Visafone acquired by MTN Nigeria, trials LTE in the 800MHz band;
Additional base stations installed under the USPF program;
Airtel Nigeria and Etisalat sell tower infrastructure;
Smile Communications extends LTE;
Report update includes operator data to Q2 2016, regulator’s market data updates to June 2016, recent market developments.Companies mentioned in this report:
Nigerian Telecommunications (Nitel, Pentascope, Transcorp), NATCOM Consortium, Globacom, VGC Communications (MTN), Nepskom Communications, MTS First Wireless, Suburban Telecom, Backbone Connectivity Network (BCN), Traffic Network Services, Fibre Tech West Africa, Phase3 Telecom, Alheri Engineering, Gateway Telecoms Integrated Services, Mobitel Nigeria, Prestel (O-Mobile), Galaxy Backbone, 21st Century Technologies, Main One (Mainstreet Technologies), Brymedia, NigComSat, O3b Networks, WASACE, Nitel, Cyberspace, Hyperia, Linkserve, Pinet Informatics, Odu’a Telecom, Swift Networks, Startech Connection, Netcom Africa, MWEB Nigeria, Gateway Communications, Accelon (Internet Solutions), Galaxy Information Technology and Telecommunication, Polestar, Naija Wi-Fi, Suburban Telecom, Zinox, Direct-on-PC, IP Direct, Starcomms, Layer3, Communication Trends Nigeria, Entertainment Highway (HiTV), MTN Nigeria, Glo Mobile (Globacom), Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain, Celtel), Etisalat Nigeria (EMTS, Mubadala), M-Tel (Nitel), Visafone, Starcomms (Capcom), Multi-Links, Reliance, Intercellular, Megatech Engineering (Zoda Fones), Telkom, Econet Wireless, Vodacom.


【レポートの目次】

1. Key statistics
1.1 Country overview
2. Telecommunications market
2.1 Historical overview
3. Regulatory environment
3.1 Regulatory authority
3.2 National Telecommunications Policy (NTP)
3.3 Nigerian Communications Act
3.4 West African common regulatory framework
3.5 Class Licence policy extension
3.6 Interconnection
3.7 Infrastructure sharing
3.8 No regulation on state level
3.9 2.6GHz auction – 2016
3.10 Universal service
3.10.1 National Rural Telephony Program (NRTP)
3.10.2 National Information Technology Development (NITD) Fund
3.10.3 Backbone Transmission Infrastructure Project (BTRAIN)
3.11 Telecom sector liberalisation
3.11.1 Globacom’s SNO licence
3.11.2 Regional fixed-wireless access (FWA) licences
3.11.3 International gateway licences
3.11.4 Unified licensing regime
3.11.5 Regional broadband infrastructure licences
3.12 Privatisation of Nitel
3.12.1 IPO
3.12.2 Liquidation
4. Fixed network operators
4.1 Nigerian Telecommunications (Nitel, defunct)
4.1.1 Network infrastructure
4.1.2 National backbone network
4.1.3 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)
4.1.4 Services
4.1.5 Debts
4.1.6 The Pentascope period, 2003-2005
4.1.7 The Transcorp period, 2006-2009
4.1.8 Privatisation attempts 2010-2012
4.1.9 Liquidation
4.2 Globacom
4.2.1 Network infrastructure
4.2.2 Fibre optic backbone network
4.2.3 International presence
4.2.4 Services
4.2.5 International expansion
4.3 VGC Communications, MTN
4.4 National Long-Distance Operators (NLDO)
4.5 Fixed-wireless network operators
4.5.1 MTS First Wireless
4.5.2 Mobitel Nigeria
4.5.3 Prestel (O-Mobile)
4.5.4 Regional FWA operators
5. Telecommunications infrastructure
5.1 Overview of the national telecom network
5.2 Backbone networks
5.2.1 National Information Infrastructure Backbone (NIIB)
5.2.2 Galaxy Backbone
5.2.3 Suburban Telecom
5.2.4 Phase3 Telecom
5.2.5 Backbone Connectivity Network (BCN)
5.2.6 Private networks
5.3 Terrestrial fibre
5.3.1 The Central African Backbone (CAB)
5.3.2 Nigeria – Niger link
5.4 International infrastructure
5.4.1 Submarine fibre
5.4.2 Satellite
6. Broadband market
6.1 Introduction and statistical overview
6.1.1 Market analysis
6.1.2 Internet Exchange Points (IXP)
6.1.3 National Broadband Plan
6.1.4 Broadband statistics
6.2 Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) networks
6.2.1 Nitel
6.2.2 Cyberspace
6.2.3 Hyperia
6.2.4 Linkserve
6.2.5 21st Century Technologies
6.2.6 Pinet Informatics
6.3 Fibre-to-the-Premises (FttP) networks
6.4 Other fixed broadband services
6.4.1 Broadband over Powerlines (BPL)
6.4.2 Fixed wireless
7. Digital media
7.1 Cable TV
7.2 Videostreaming
7.3 Digital TV
7.4 Facebook
7.5 Communications: VoIP
8. Digital economy
8.1 E-commerce, e-payments
8.2 E-government
8.3 E-health
8.4 E-learning
9. Mobile communications
9.1 Market analysis
9.2 Mobile statistics
9.2.1 General statistics
9.2.2 Mobile voice
9.2.3 Mobile data
9.2.4 Mobile broadband
9.2.5 Forecasts – mobile subscribers – 2016; 2018; 2021
9.3 Regulatory issues
9.3.1 GSM licence terms
9.3.2 Spectrum
9.3.3 Interconnection
9.3.4 Mobile tariffs
9.3.5 Unified licensing regime
9.3.6 Universal service
9.3.7 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)
9.3.8 Central equipment identity register
9.3.9 Quality of Service
9.3.10 SIM card registration
9.4 Mobile infrastructure
9.4.1 International gateways
9.4.2 National mobile infrastructure plan
9.4.3 Tower infrastructure
9.4.4 Analogue networks
9.4.5 Digital networks
9.4.6 Other infrastructure developments
9.5 Major GSM mobile operators
9.5.1 MTN Nigeria
9.5.2 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain/Celtel Nigeria)
9.5.3 Globacom
9.5.4 Etisalat Nigeria (EMTS, Mubadala)
9.5.5 M-Tel
9.6 Major CDMA mobile operators
9.6.1 Multi-Links Telkom
9.6.2 Reliance Telecommunications (Reltel, Zoom)
9.6.3 Starcomms (Capcom)
9.6.4 Intercellular Nigeria
9.6.5 Visafone
9.7 Mobile content and applications
9.7.1 Mobile money transfer, m-banking
9.7.2 M-health
9.7.3 Mobile TV
Table 1 – Country statistics – 2015
Table 2 – Fixed-line network statistics – 2016 (e)
Table 3 – Internet provider statistics – 2016
Table 4 – Internet user statistics – 2016 (e)
Table 5 – Mobile statistics – 2016 (e)
Table 6 – National telecommunications authority
Table 7 – Telecom sector contribution to GDP – 2010 – 2016
Table 8 – Financial bids for Nitel/M-Tel, first and second round – 2010
Table 9 – Historic – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1999 – 2009
Table 10 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 2010 – 2017
Table 11 – Fixed-wireless lines by operator – 2014 – 2016
Table 12 – Fixed-wired lines by operator – 2014 – 2016
Table 13 – International internet bandwidth in Nigeria – 2001 – 2015
Table 14 – Internet users and penetration rate in Nigeria – 2000 – 2017
Table 15 – Fixed-line broadband subscribers – 2007 – 2017
Table 16 – Fixed-line broadband subscribers by operator – 2014 – 2016
Table 17 – Active fixed-wireless broadband lines – 2007 – 2015
Table 18 – Historic – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1998 – 2009
Table 19 – Mobile subscribers (active) and penetration rate – 2010 – 2017
Table 20 – Mobile market share of subscribers by operator – 2011 – 2016
Table 21 – Prepaid mobile subscribers – 2003 – 2016
Table 22 – Mobile subscribers (GSM) by operator, technology – June 2016
Table 23 – Mobile subscribers (CDMA) by operator, technology – June 2016
Table 24 – Installed mobile base stations by GSM operator – 2013 – 2014
Table 25 – Installed mobile base stations by CDMA operator – 2013 – 2014
Table 26 – SMS traffic – 2006 – 2016
Table 27 – Mobile internet subscribers in Nigeria by operator (GSM) – 2012 – 2016
Table 28 – Active mobile broadband subscribers – 2010 – 2016
Table 29 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Nigeria – 2016; 2018; 2021
Table 30 – Outgoing mobile number portings – 2013 – 2016
Table 31 – GSM subscribers in Nigeria – 2014 – 2016
Table 32 – MTN Nigeria data plan pricing – 2016
Table 33 – Active CDMA subscribers – 2014 – 2016
Table 34 – MTN mobile subscribers – 2011 – 2016
Table 35 – MTN Nigeria financial data – 2010 – 2016
Table 36 – MTN Nigeria ARPU – 2002 – 2016
Table 37 – Airtel mobile subscribers – 2011 – 2016
Table 38 – Globacom mobile subscribers – 2011 – 2016
Table 39 – Etisalat mobile subscribers – 2011 – 2016
Table 40 – Etisalat mobile revenue and capex – 2013 – 2016
Table 41 – CDMA subscribers by operator – 2011 – 2016
Table 42 – Starcomms mobile subscribers – 2005 – 2014
Table 43 – Visafone mobile subscribers – 2009; 2013 – 2016
Chart 1 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 2005 – 2017
Chart 2 – Internet users and penetration rate in Nigeria – 2000 – 2017
Chart 3 – Mobile subscribers and penetration – 2005 – 2017
Exhibit 1 – Regional FWA licensees
Exhibit 2 – Regional FWA licensees in Nigeria
Exhibit 3 – Ownership battle – from EWN to Vee Networks to V-Mobile to Zain to Bharti Airtel



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